Category Archives: Acquisitions

Digitised audio recordings of Revd James Parkes

22 December marks the 120th anniversary of the birth of Revd Dr James William Parkes. The transfer of his Library and archive to the University of Southampton in 1964 marked the start of a half century of significant growth, both in the Parkes Library and in Jewish archive collections, transforming Southampton into a major Jewish documentation centre. Amongst the predominantly paper based archive collection were a series of audio material in analogue or obsolete formats. This material, which includes recordings of sermons and talks during the 1960s and 1970s, has been transferred to digital to make it available for research.

Revd James Parkes in studio for a radio broadcast [MS 60/34/6]

Revd James Parkes in studio for a radio broadcast [MS 60/34/6]

The sermons include “The End of the Way” delivered by Parkes at the Church of St Edward King and Martyr, Cambridge, at the close of the conference of the International Council of Christians and Jews (ICCJ) on Jewish-Christian co-operation in 1966 [MS 60/4/6]; and “The Road to Jerusalem” consisting of five sermons for Lent given at Salisbury Cathedral in 1967 [MS 60/4/8/5], sequentially titled “Jesus Clears His Mind – The Temptations”, “The Road Through Tradition”, “The Road Through Teaching”, “The Road Through Healing” and “The Road Through Suffering”.

Recordings of talks by Parkes include “Israel, the diaspora and the world outside” recorded for the BBC, 1 September 1966 [MS 60/4/6]; “Jewish Students between the Wars” delivered to the Oxford University Jewish Society on 14 May 1967 [MS 60/4/8/8]; and “Tradition and Adventure” given at the Westminster Synagogue on 13 June 1967 [MS 60/4/8/8].

The collection also contains two recordings focusing on the life of James Parkes. These include “Journeying” recorded by Parkes’ wife, Dorothy, on 29 April 1977 [MS 60/37/1]; and “Word of Greeting” recorded by Dr Morton C Fierman, California State University, for a colloquium held by the International Council of Christians and Jews in honour of Rev Dr James Parkes and Professor Jules Isaac at Connaught Hall, Southampton, on 20 July 1977 [MS 60/37/1].

The earliest recording is of the opening of the Parkes Library at the University of Southampton on 23 June 1965 [MS 60/4/6]. The event included speeches by Edmund Leopold de Rothschild, and Lord Perth, Vice President of the Council of Christians and Jews. In his introductory speech, the University’s Deputy Vice Chancellor announced the establishment of the Parkes Library Fellowship, a post intended to raise the profile of the collection and to help secure funding for the international research centre envisaged by James Parkes.

Photograph of the official opening of the Parkes Library at the University of Southampton Library, 23 June 1965 [Univ. Coll. Photos LF 789.5L46]

Photograph of the official opening of the Parkes Library at the University of Southampton Library, 23 June 1965 [Univ. Coll. Photos LF 789.5L46]

The following thirty years saw a series of distinguished Parkes Library Fellows working on the collection, but it was not until 1996 — the year of his centenary — that Parkes Centre for the Study of Jewish/non-Jewish Relations was launched. Five years later the Parkes Institute was created to coordinate and expand the activities of what had become the AHRB Parkes Centre, and the associated library and archive collections.

All of the recordings are now available to access in the Archives and Manuscripts reading room.

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Waterloo & MS 300: Peninsular War papers of S.G.P. Ward

Last year’s celebrations for the bicentenary of the Battle of Waterloo saw many commemorative events to mark the famous Allied victory of 18th June 1815. Conferences, lectures and new publications continued the historical debate on the history and significance of the Peninsular War. Waterloo has exerted a powerful influence on the public imagination for over 200 years – many contemporaries visited the battlefield as tourists, recording their experiences in works of art and literature. Souvenir engravings and maps, and exhibitions of paintings and artefacts relating to the battle, were popular at the time:

Chateau of Hougoumont

‘An entrance to the Chateau of Hougoumont: “It was here that the great battle of the 18th began…. the house was set fire to… and all the wounded perished in the flames.”’

The Barn at La Haye Sainte

‘The Barn at La Haye Sainte: “It was in this extensive building that more than 500 hundred limbs were amputated – what hospital of contemporary establishment can vie with it.”’

MS 300 A4011/16/2: sketches by Robert Hills of the ‘important scenes of action about the plains of Waterloo’, c. July 1815, published in The Illustrated London News, December 1945

These sketches are part of a series drawn by Robert Hills a few weeks after the battle. Note the slightly sensational captions which he has added to the scenes!

The Hill sketches were published in the Christmas 1945 edition of The Illustrated London News. A copy can be found in MS 300, the Peninsular War papers of Stephen George Peregrine Ward, military historian. These were donated to the University of Southampton along with his notable Peninsular War library. It is no coincidence that there was renewed interest in the study of the Napoleonic Wars in the post-WWII era: Mr Ward had served in Western Command during the Second World War, during which time he was introduced to the administrative problems of running a general staff and to the Murray papers in the National Library of Scotland. This, together with the acquisition of many of the Peninsular War items from the library of Sir Charles Oman, c. 1946, was the genesis of Ward’s work on the Peninsula, leading to his Oxford B.Litt. thesis, published as Wellington’s headquarters: a study of the administrative problems in the Peninsula, 1809-1814 (Oxford, 1957) and Wellington, (London, 1963).

Sir George Murray

Sir George Murray

MS 300 A4011/15/8ix: an engraving of Rt. Hon. Gen. Sir George Murray G.C.B., F.R.S., painted by Sir Thomas Lawrence, engraved by H.Meyer, published by Fisher, Son & Co., (London 1831)

We have recently catalogued an additional deposit of S.G.P. Ward’s papers held in the Special Collections at the University of Southampton. MS 300 A4011 includes a copy of his B.Litt. thesis and a number of his publications, articles and lectures. Ward was working on a biography of Major General Sir George Murray, Wellington’s Quartermaster General in the Peninsula. The work remained unfinished at his death, but Ward’s typescript draft – which includes complete chapters – as well as many of his research notes, form a valuable resource for historians. An acknowledged expert, Ward wrote the Oxford D.N.B. entry for Sir George Murray – which is current today.

Another useful part of this collection is the large number of photographic prints of portraits and paintings – both of Murray and his family, as well as of generals and military figures of different nationalities – from the Napoleonic period.

Ward acquired original manuscript material as well as copies and transcripts of archive sources relating to the Peninsular War. An unusual example is the Commissariat papers of Henry Whitmarsh c. 1812-14, (MS 351/7 A4237). These shed light on the logistical problems involved in moving large numbers of cattle between army depots in the Iberian Peninsula – essential for the maintenance of Wellington’s army. We learn that Henry had expected promotion, but was disappointed, and he complains that many gentlemen were obliged to return to England for their promotion.

In ‘Notes by Brigadier General Pack respecting Almeida’ (MS 351/9 A4242) we read a first-hand account of Brigadier General Sir Denis Pack’s experiences in the Peninsula in April and May 1811. The notes were enclosed in a letter to a friend dated 22 May 1811 and both are full of interesting detail. Pack’s Portuguese brigade, under the orders of Major General Campbell, was to support the blockade of the French garrison at Almeida: “On the 3rd [May] about 2 o’clock a.m. I received orders to relieve all the picquets of [Campbell’s] division with my brigade to which, with the addition of an English battalion (the Queen’s 400 strong) and 2 guns, I was informed the blockade was intrusted under my direction. A more distressingly anxious command I never had – Massena’s first attack on Lord Wellington’s lines (distant about 5 miles) commenced at 10 o’clock that day. The garrison almost immediately became emboldened, stronger picquets than usual were sent out from it; frequent skirmishes ensued and signals were distinctly made by rockets, guns, and lights, which were answered by the enemy’s army or from Ciudad Rodrigo.” When the French garrison escaped, Pack and his picquets pursued them all the way to the bridge over the River Aguedo at Barba de Puerco. General Campbell and his men arrived “most critically at the moment [the enemy] was making good his retreat across the Agueda – ten minutes sooner would have placed him in safety – ten minutes later, and his destruction would have been inevitable; as it was in killed, wounded, drowned and prisoners I should imagine he lost nearly half his men.”

To find out more, why not visit the Archives and Manuscripts to view the manuscript collections.

The development of Special Collections

From June until December 2016, there will be a building project taking place in the Hartley Library. As a result, between June and September, the Archives and Manuscripts and Rare Books reading room will be running a restricted service: this might include brief periods of closure. While updates will be made available through our website, we take the opportunity to reflect on the development of the Special Collections division down through the years…

Early developments
The archive holdings date back to the 1860s, soon after the foundation of the Hartley Institution, the earliest predecessor of the University of Southampton. The Institution was founded as a local learned institution and had among its facilities both a library and museum. Between them, they gathered in or were presented with a number of manuscript collections. The early collections were eclectic in nature, ranging from the papers of local seamen and materials clearly brought back from their travels; to records that may have their origins in the archives of the corporation of Southampton, with which the Hartley Institution was closely associated; and groups of letters, some coherent archive groups, put together by autograph collectors. As early as 1873, the minute book of the library committee records the presentation of ‘Specimens of old English writing in the form of deeds, upon condition that they be bound’ (now MS 28).

Item from a collection of deeds relating to property in Petersfield and Mapledurham, principally for ‘Gobyesmede', together with lands in Liss and Sheet, Hampshire [MS 36 AO143]

Item from a collection of deeds relating to property in Petersfield and Mapledurham, principally for ‘Gobyesmede’, together with lands in Liss and Sheet, Hampshire [MS 36 AO143]

The Institution’s collections included items of more general interest, ranging from Renaissance drawings to manuscripts from among purchases and bequests of books. The Library and Museum received materials relating to the locality, to Hampshire and the Isle of Wight, the most important of which, the Cope bequest, contained manuscript (now MS 5) as well as printed items. With the establishment of local record offices, in Hampshire, for the county and city of Winchester, in and after 1947, for the corporation of Southampton in 1951 and for the corporation of Portsmouth, papers of local interest were directed there and local topographical manuscripts ceased to be an active focus for the University’s collecting policy. In 1972, the University dispersed to local record offices all the local material that it did not own; the material was transferred principally to the Hampshire Record Office, where it now has the reference 46M72 and 7M87-110m87. At the same time the remnants of the holdings of the museum of the Hartley Institution were transferred to Southampton City Museums, with the exception of some of the rock collections, which remain in the Geology Department. The maintenance of the Cope collection as a collection of materials of local interest continues, although its accessions are now almost exclusively printed.

Acquiring the Wellington and Broadlands archives
A new chapter of the University’s archive collecting commenced in 1983, when the papers of the first Duke of Wellington were allocated to the University under the national heritage legislation. There are close links between the University and the Dukes of Wellington: the seventh Duke became in 1952 the first Chancellor of the new University of Southampton, the fruition of a campaign supported by his family for a university of Wessex. Further significant acquisitions of manuscripts ensued, the Broadlands archive in 1985-7 (including the Palmerston and Mountbatten papers), followed by accessions of supporting collections. The conversion of a part of the University Library in 1982-3 to provide appropriate accommodation for the Wellington Papers was followed in 1987 by the provision of new archive strongrooms and an enlarged reading room.

The official opening of the Wellington Suite, 14 May 1983. Dr Chris Woolgar shows a bound volume of the papers to the Duke and Duchess of Wellington.

The official opening of the Wellington Suite, 14 May 1983. Dr Chris Woolgar shows a bound volume of the papers to the Duke and Duchess of Wellington.

The development of the Anglo-Jewish collections
The University has had through the collections of C.G.Montefiore, a former President of the University College, and through the library of Dr James Parkes, a special interest in papers concerning the relations of the Jewish people with other peoples; since 1989 this has been developed with a particular focus on the records of Anglo-Jewry, of national organisations and of individuals, and in 1990 many of the collections of the Anglo-Jewish Archives were transferred to the Library. The principal genealogical holdings of the Anglo-Jewish Archives, the Montefiore-Hyamson, D’Arcy Hart and Colyer-Fergusson collections were transferred at this date to the Society of Genealogists in London. In the range of these materials, the University and researchers have good reason to thank those individuals who, since 1963, had worked through Anglo-Jewish Archives towards the preservation of the records of the Anglo-Jewish community. A considerable number of major accessions relating to Anglo-Jewry has been received since 1990 and this continues to be an area where collecting is most active.

Expanded accommodation
As part of a major building project in the Hartley Library in 2002-4, the Special Collections accommodation was greatly enlarged. This included an additional strongroom and a new reading room, which doubled reader spaces. The extension also provided an opportunity to incorporate public exhibition space as an integral part of the library environment. This space includes the Special Collections Exhibition Gallery and the Level 4 Gallery.

Visitors to the Wellington and Waterloo exhibition in the Special Collections Gallery

Visitors to the Wellington and Waterloo exhibition in the Special Collections Gallery

The Special Collections Gallery was funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund primarily for the display of material from the collections to encourage public awareness and access. The exhibition programme focuses on themes within the collection and links in with University academic activity including celebrations of research, conferences and contributions to national and international events and commemorations.

Recent developments
The range of collections continues to expand and develop with recent acquisitions including papers relating to Basque child refugees (MS 370 and MS 404), the papers of Ian Herman Karten (MS 409), and new collection of Wellington related material (MS 351/6). Meanwhile our first group of digitised collections are available to access online through the Virtual Reading Room, with other recent developments including the establishment of our social media channels, including our WordPress blog and Facebook page.

For updates on other developments and how the building project will impact on our services please visit our website at:
http://www.southampton.ac.uk/archives/.

Ian Karten, MBE

The papers of Ian Herman Karten, MBE (1920-2011) [MS 409 A4140] have recently been listed and are now available for research. Ian Karten was born in Vienna although to a family of Polish nationality.  At the age of 3 he moved to Duisburg in Germany where his father started a business.  Facing anti-Semitism at his German school, at 16 Karten was sent to a Jewish School in Cologne.  In 1938 he obtained a visa to come to England and studied Medical Engineering at Battersea College (now the University of Surrey).  He served in the RAF during World War Two.  At the end of the war he was assigned to an air disarmament unit which was set up to take over German airfields.

Kartenwithplanes

After the war, Karten worked with the RAF disarmament wing in Denmark and Germany

Almost all of Karten’s family died in the Holocaust including his father Israel, his brother Max, his sister Fanny and his grandfather Gedalia.  After the War, his mother Helen (Chanah) came to live with him in the UK.

IanFannyandMax

Karten (front) with his siblings Fanny and Max

In 1946 Karten joined Multitone Electronic Ltd.  He managed to turn this company around becoming Managing Director, Chairman and the CEO.

Karten met Mildred Hart at an Anglo-Jewish Association gathering in the 1960s; they married at the Chelsea Affiliated Synagogue in December 1968.

Ian and Mildred's wedding

Ian and Mildred’s wedding

The Ian Karten Charitable Trust was created after Karten sold his share in Multitone Electronics.  Its was established as a grant-making trust in 1980 to offer educational opportunities to those in need.

In 1996 the Trustees decided to devote a substantial part of the Trust’s resources to the establishment of centres for disabled people to be known as Computer-Aided Training, Education and Communication (CTEC) Centres. The first CTEC Centre was established in 1997 in Berkshire.

Since the 1990s, the Parkes Institute for the study of Jewish/Non-Jewish Relations at the University of Southampton has been a benefactor of the Karten Trust with the endowment of a lectureship, a fellowship and most recently, a post in outreach work.

After being awarded his honorary degree from the University of Southampton

Karten in his University of Southampton degree robes

In 1998 Karten was awarded an honorary doctorate from the University of Southampton. In 1999 he was awarded an MBE for his ‘services to charity’.  In 2000 he was awarded an Honorary Degree from the University of Haifa.

The collection includes correspondence with lawyers concerning reparations for losses suffered during the Holocaust, an extensive photographic collection including many photographs of Karten and his family in Germany prior to the war, papers respecting Karten’s purchase of shares in Multitone Electric Company and commemorative photographs, certificates and objects respecting the CTEC Centres.  Please see our website to find out how to access this material.

The Ian and Mildred Karten Memorial Lecture is part of the Parkes Institute annual lecture series and has been named to honour the generosity and interest shown by Ian and Mildred in the Parkes Institute. This year’s lecture “Imagining the Jewish Past: writing The Wolf in the Water, a play about Jessica, Shylock’s daughter?” is being given by Naomi Alderman. It takes place on 10 May 2016.

Death and commemoration of the Duke of Wellington

Arthur Wellesley, first Duke of Wellington, died on 14 September 1852, at Walmer Castle, Kent. He was regarded as one of one of Britain’s premier soldier, a reputation that was sealed by his defeat of Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815. Yet he also enjoyed a long political career, serving twice as Prime Minister of Great Britain, 1828-30 and 1834.

Nautilus shell, engraved by C.H.Wood, depicting the Duke of Wellington on one side (and St George slaying a dragon on the other)

Nautilus shell, engraved by C.H.Wood, depicting the Duke of Wellington on one side (and St George slaying a dragon on the other) from the collection MS 351/6

As befitted his status as a national hero, Wellington was given a state funeral. After lying in state at Walmer, his body was moved to Chelsea Hospital on the night of 10 November and laid in state there until the 17th when he was moved to the Horse Guards. At 7.30am the following morning a grand funeral procession proceeded from St James Park through Piccadilly, Pall Mall, Charing Cross and the Strand and on to St Paul’s Cathedral. An estimate crowd of one and a half million people watched the procession. Wellington’s state funeral was the first large-scale service under the dome of the cathedral and the building was closed for six weeks prior to the event to install seating for the 13,000 people attending.

The Illustrated London News in its coverage of the funeral noted:
“With pomp and circumstances, a fervour of popular respect, a solemnity and a grandeur never before seen in our time, and in all probability, not to be surpassed in the obsequies of any other hero heretofore to be born… the sacred relics of Arthur Duke of Wellington have been deposited in the place long since set apart by the unanimous design of his countrymen.”

The University of Southampton is the home to the principal collection of the papers of Wellington. The archive contains approximately 100,000 items of the Duke’s political, military, official and diplomatic papers covering all aspects of his career between 1790 and 1852.

The University has recently acquired an interesting new collection of Wellington related material (MS 351/6). Part of this new collection will feature in the Special Collections exhibition to mark the bicentenary of Waterloo in 2015. As well as an intriguing letter from Wellington to Major Dickson of the Royal Artillery from 1812, there is a fine series of nineteenth-century military illustrations (several of Wellington and the Battle of Waterloo), Cruikshank cartoons and a contemporary map of the Battle of Waterloo. The most unusual item is a nautilus shell, engraved by C.H.Wood, depicting the Duke of Wellington on one side and St George slaying a dragon on the other. C.H.Wood was a specialist in this nineteenth-century art form and shells by him were exhibited at the Great Exhibition of 1851. A shell produced by Wood to commemorate Lord Nelson is held at the National Maritime Museum in London.

Manuscript Collections: Papers of Frank Templeton Prince

Prince workshop on Wednesday April 30th, 2014
Wednesday April 30th saw Special Collections hosting a poetry workshop based on the F.T. Prince Archive. The archive was gifted to the university by the poet and Milton scholar F.T. Prince, but embargoed until 2012. Prince helped found the university’s English department when he joined the university in 1946.

Portrait of Frank Templeton Prince (1912-2003)

Portrait of Frank Templeton Prince (1912-2003)

The afternoon event was a chance for university alumni to see some of the archive’s treasures, including unpublished letters by T.S. Eliot, W.H. Auden, and E.M. Forster. It was also a chance to get to know Prince’s poetry: though many of the workshop participants had been taught by Prince, it was the first time they had been given a chance to discuss his work. Beatrice Clarke, who studied English under Prince in the 1960s called it ‘the best kind of keeping alive of a scholarly man’s work – respectful, but properly questioning and critical’. Another seminar participant, Michael Hinds, noted it was ‘the first time I had experienced working and talking around manuscript material’ and found it ‘very enjoyable and rewarding’. The session was led by Dr Will May, a Senior Lecturer in English at the University.


Papers of Frank Templeton Prince (1912-2003)

Prince was born in Kimberley, South Africa, the son of a Jewish diamond expert and a Scottish Presbyterian. He was educated at the Christian Brothers’ College, Kimberley, and then came to the UK to read English at Balliol College, Oxford. From 1940-6, Prince served in the Army Intelligence Corps. In 1946 he joined the English Department at the University of Southampton, where he was Professor 1957-74. Prince subsequently taught at the University of the West Indies, in the United States and in North Yemen. He delivered the Clark Lectures at Cambridge University in 1972-3.

Extract from a draft of The Swimmers

Extract from a draft of ‘The Swimmers’ from the collection MS 328 Papers of Professor Frank Templeton Prince

Prince was a poet of some renown. He is probably best remembered for his collection Soldiers Bathing (1954), the title poem of which is one of the most anthologised poems of the Second World War. Written in 1942, it presents soldiers relaxing by a river and culminates in a power evocation of the naked Christ on the cross. Initially championed by T.S.Eliot, Prince’s poetry was to quickly fall out of fashion. He was admired by and influenced the New York school, a group of writers that flourished in the 1960s, and was regard by John Ashbery, the group’s most famous poet, as one of the most significant poets of the twentieth century.

The Prince archive (MS 328) contains an important collection of Prince’s poetry and prose writings, as well as a range of correspondence with notable literary figures, including W.H.Auden, Stephen Spender, C.S.Lewis, E.M.Forster and T.S.Eliot who, as editor at Faber and Faber, was a supporter of Prince’s poetry.


New Prince related acquisitions

Over the last few months, the University of Southampton has acquired two further collections of papers relating to Frank Prince.

The first of these (MS 328 A4131) is a collection of papers of Professor Jacques Berthoud (1935- 2001). Berthoud was recruited by Prince to join the English Department at the University of Southampton and worked alongside Prince at the University until 1979 when he moved to the University of York. A native of Berne, Berthoud was educated in South Africa.

The second collection (MS 328 A4165) is that of the poet W.G. (Bill) Shepherd (1935-2012). Of particular significance here is a series of 35 letters from Prince to Shepherd, 1986-2000, in which they discuss poetry and the genesis of some of the Prince’s writing.